IN THE NEWS
ASTS pursues tomorrow's agriculture
ASTS | 2009-27-11 01:37:51 PM

The Agricultural Science and Technology School is pursuing tomorrow’s agriculture. Using modern systems like greenhouse and pressurized irrigation technologies, the school exploits hydroponic techniques to grow honeydew melon.
The ASTS was established on August 18, 1995 to revitalize the curriculum of the Central Luzon Agricultural School. Its main objective is to train future farmers the modern ways of farming by applying new technological innovations.
The school has a 1,000 sq m technology demonstration farm with a Pinoy tropical greenhouse measuring 4 m high x 6 m wide and 22 m long. The greenhouse has a natural ventilation system made of locally available materials and Filipino ingenuity. This project aims to exhibit various set ups of low-cost hydroponic systems using mixtures of non-soil growing media such as sand, gravel, pumice and rice hull to grow high value crops irrigated with an automated recirculating drip method in protected environment.
The project is funded P222,575 by the Department of Science and Technology- Region 3. Headed by Dr. Conrado J. Oliveros, regional director, the project was facilitated by Dr. Julius V. Sicat, assistant regional director for technical services, through the provincial science and technology director, Orlando G. Anselmo. Dr. Ruben C. Sevilleja, CLSU president fully supports the project and welcomes more development in the school such as the creation of a center for advanced agricultural technologies.
The techno-demo farm has a nursery for the propagation of seedlings like honeydew melon where the nutrient solution reservoir and automatic controller are also housed. The farm will also conduct initial trials in integrating aquaculture and hydroponics or aquaponics. Aquaponics is a system of growing fish together with vegetables using the fish effluent, the nutrient-rich water that results from raising fish as source of natural fertilizer for the growing plants. As the plants consume the nutrients, they help to purify the water that the fish live in. The natural microbial process keeps both the fish and plants healthy and helps sustain an environment in which they both can thrive using one infrastructure.
In line with the university’s thrust, the school will pursue advanced agricultural technologies to help in addressing the government’s call to modernize the agriculture and fishery sectors and educate Filipinos to believe that agriculture is potentially an effective weapon against hunger and poverty. Dr. Chito F. Sace is the project leader.

Source: CLSU Newsletter

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The Agricultural Science and Technology School is now pursuing tomorrow’s agriculture. Using modern systems like greenhouse and pressurized irrigation technologies, the school exploits hydroponic techniques to grow honeydew melon and other high value crops.

Established on August 18,...

The Agricultural Science and Technology School is pursuing tomorrow’s agriculture. Using modern systems like greenhouse and pressurized irrigation technologies, the school exploits hydroponic techniques to grow honeydew melon.
The ASTS was established on August 18, 1995 to revitalize t...